Assessment 1 Week 3: Critical Response (draft 3)

Critical thinking in art and design practices is taking more time looking at a visual text allowing you “to feel ‘full’ of what it offers you”(“Working with Images and Ideas” 18). Key points that will be discussed about critical thinking includes firstly gives us a deeper understanding and appreciation for their work, the next would be to help us understand and see changes happening in the world. Lastly, I will be writing about critically thinking teaches us to take what we have learnt in these texts and produce new knowledge.

Firstly, one of the key points I found important about critical thinking in art and design practices is that we gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for the visual text. This may be done through identifying the context as stated in Clarke’s “Language and Meaning” section. During my field trip, I found that reviewing the context of both sites either sourcing further information on the internet or simply looking closer at where they are located and when they may have been built, I was able to understand and appreciate what they had to offer. For example, through researching the San Fran Bar I found that the location has been in existence since the 1960’s but was not always a Bar or Nightclub. Interestingly, the site was previously a bathhouse and from researching this information, I gained a deeper understanding of its history.

San-Fran-Bath-House
San Fransico Bath House Sign, article posted by Hussein Moses, 2013

The next point that states why critical thinking may be important when viewing visual texts closely is we understand how to see the world around us. Today the world has become encompassed by digital media and the internet. Specifically this has changed our forms of communication resulting in text messages, digital photographs or videos via the internet being a main source. Mirzoeff suggests that “Like it or not, the emerging global society is visual. All these photographs and videos are our way of trying to see the world” (6). He earlier discussed one of the first photographs ever taken in space, the Blue Marble as a visual text that signified the world as a unified, whole and that it signified the knowledge that we already knew and what was to come in the process. It is clear that what the world around us is today was indefinitely different than when that photograph was taken in 1972.

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Blue Marble, Image Courtesy of NASA Johnson Space Centre, Jack Schmitt, Apollo 17, 1972

In addition, as stated by Wallace, Andrew, Shirato and Bright in their “Critical Thinking” section on their book, by looking closer at the visual texts you learn how to become a ‘reasoner’. This essentially means “to think in a sensible and connected manner”(Wallace, Andrew, Shirato and Bright 47). This could be making use of the knowledge available to you including the examples of work from other artists and designers and constructing new ideas from them in a logical process. These new ideas you would add to your own work, thus furthering your ideas and understanding.

In conclusion with the ideas that have been explained, it is clear that having a critical thought process would be essential when looking into visual texts within art and design practices. The ideas that were mentioned included receiving a better understanding and respect for the artists intentions, becoming aware of the world around and having an understanding revising what we already know in order to discover new found knowledge. All these points help contribute to our own work.

Works Citied

Nicholas Mirzoeff. How to See the World “Introduction”. London: Pelican, 2015. pg. 1-27. Print.

Michael Clarke. Verbalizing the Visual: Translating Art and Design into Words. “Language and Meaning.” Lausanne, Switzerland: AVA Publishing. 2007 pg 20-25. Print.

Ruszkiewicz, John, Daniel Anderson and Christy Friend. “Reading Texts.” Beyond Words: Cultural Texts for Reading and Writing. 3rd ed. Boston: Pearson, c2012. pg 32-34

Annals, Alison, Abby, Cunnane, and Sam Cunnane. “Working with Images and Ideas.” Saying What You See: How to Write and Talk about Art. North Shore, NZ :Pearson Ed. 2009. 15-39. Print.

http://thecorner.co.nz/2013/02/15/trouble-for-wellingtons-san-francisco-bath-house/

 

 

Assessment 1 Week 3: Writing Response “Critical Thinking”

Wallace, Andrew, Tony Schirato and Phillipa Bright’s “Critical Thinking” section from their Beginning University:Thinking, Researching and Writing  for Success book dwells into the different ways and the importance of Critical thinking, how most of what we know and believe is modeled by the language used and how culture may affect how things should be done. In addition, these authors also write about how to involve reasoning, thereby using what you already know, making use of this through simple logic. I think that overall, this piece of writing has valid points when applying critical thought into everyday situations.

I notice that the voice of the authors are somewhat leveled, neither aggressive or passive. It is clear that they do not position themselves in a personal view but more an authoritative perspective. Therefore, they predominantly use the pronoun ‘you’ within this reading. Their tone that they use makes their content believable. I found that they have also successfully backed up most of the points that they state with an example or explanation. However, this makes their writing at times hard to read due to the inclusion of a wide range of ideas one after the other. I found this text interesting because I learnt more about how to think about certain things but due to the reason of there being a large amount of ideas together I did not enjoy the text as much as I would have.

Assessment 1 Week 3: Critical Response (draft 2)

Introduction:

Critical thinking is an essential part within art and design practices whilst looking at visual texts. Each designer or artist would think critically more than what appears on the surface. The viewers of their work would need to also think critically about the artists intentions. Key points that will be discussed about critical thinking includes firstly gives us a deeper understanding and appreciation for their work, the next would be to help us understand and see changes in the world. Lastly, I will be writing about how we are able to replicate similar ideas from other artists into our own work.

Key Point 1:

Firstly, one of the key points I found important about critical thinking in art and design practices is that we gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for the visual text. This may be done through identifying the context as stated in Clarke’s “Language and Meaning” section. During my field trip, I found that review the context of both sites either sourcing further information on the internet and simply looking closer at where the sites were located and when they may have been built I was able to understand and appreciate what they had to offer.

Key Point 2:

The next point that states why critical thinking may be important when viewing visual texts closely is we understand how to see the world around us. Today the world has become encompassed by digital media and the internet. Specifically this has changed our forms of communication including text messages, digital photographs or videos via the internet. Mirzoeff suggests that “Like it or not, the emerging global society is visual. All these photographs and videos are our way of trying to see the world” (6). He earlier discussed one of the first photographs ever taken in space, the Blue Marble as a visual text that signified the world as a unified, whole and that it signified the knowledge that we already knew and what was to come in the process. It is clear that what the world around us is today was indefinitely different than when that photograph was taken in 1972.

 

IMG_1431
Blue Marble, Image Courtesy of NASA Johnson Space Centre, Jack Schmitt, Apollo 17, 1972

Key Point 3:

In addition, as stated by Wallace, Andrew, Shirato and Bright in their “Critical Thinking” section on their book, by looking closer at the visual texts you learn how to become a ‘reasoner’. This essentially means “to think in a sensible and connected manner”(Wallace, Andrew, Shirato and Bright 47). This would be to make use of the knowledge that you know such as taken insight from current artists and designers and construct new ideas from them in a logical process. These new ideas you would add to your own work, thus furthering your ideas.

Conclusion:

In conclusion with the ideas that have been explained, it is clear that having a critical thought process would be essential when looking into visual texts within art and design practices. The ideas that were mentioned included receiving a better understanding and respect for the artists intentions, becoming aware of the world around us through understanding what the artist or designer is showing in their visual text and we also learn to take in what we already know in order to learn and discover a new found knowledge. All these points help contribute to our own work.

Works Citied

Nicholas Mirzoeff. How to See the World “Introduction”. London: Pelican, 2015. pg. 1-27. Print.

Michael Clarke. Verbalizing the Visual: Translating Art and Design into Words. “Language and Meaning.” Lausanne, Switzerland: AVA Publishing. 2007 pg 20-25. Print.

Ruszkiewicz, John, Daniel Anderson and Christy Friend. “Reading Texts.” Beyond Words: Cultural Texts for Reading and Writing. 3rd ed. Boston: Pearson, c2012. pg 32-34

 

Assessment 1 Week 3 Task 1: Writing Response- Context

It is important that we know the context when thinking critically about a visual text because otherwise it may be difficult to truly understand the texts intention and ideas. Specifically, Ruskiewicz explains that at this time a visual texts meaning could be easily understood but in the future those who view it may not be able to understand without knowing its context. It is also stated that ” Sometimes you also have to connect a work to a complex web of events to understand it” (Ruskiewicz 32).

Work citied:
Ruszkiewicz,et al. “Reading Texts”. Beyond Words: Cultural Texts for Reading and Writing. 3rd ed. Boston: Pearson. c2012. pg 32-34. Print.

Assessment 1 Week 3: Critical Response (draft one)

Question: Explain why the processes of looking closely and thinking critically about visual texts are important to art and design practices.”

Intro:

Thesis statement- what I am going to write about– key points

define critical thinking

Point 1: Gaining a deeper understanding of the artists intentions through context

– “How different would our interpretations of any of the images reproduced here be if they were not given a cultural context?”(Clarke 25), adding Clarke’s example of Europeans and Sistine Chapel or

Talking about field trips- visiting each place and see the context that it is in i.e the location, date of opening

Point 2: Learning how to understand the world around us

The Blue Marble compared with Hoshides photo Untitled – “Above all, it seemed to show that the world was a single, unified place” (Mirzoeff 4). , “Blue Marble showed us the planet, Hoshide wants us to see just him” (8).

or

Change towards a more digital age- young, hot and wired– restating what I initially talked about in a different way

Point 3: Become a ‘reasoner’- taking what we already know and producing new knowledge from it

– “to think in a sensible and connected manner”(Wallace, Andrew, Shirato and Bright 47).

contructing through a logical process and bringing into your own work

Conclusion: 

repeating thesis statement

furthering dicussion

Assessment 1 Week 2 Task 4: Visual text analysis

This is a poster displayed on the wall behind the sound system at the San Fran Bar. It is an advertisement artwork of a band that performed at their venue. The image on the above right shows the poster on the wall and the work on the left is another example that is similar from the designer. The designer of this artwork is Willie Devine and the event took place on the 20th December 2013. The design was likely to have been created around this time.

This is  most likely a computer constructed artwork that incorporates an art mood. The design has mainly illustrative elements with its focal image being one of the band members with strikingly coloured hair. This is accompanied  by yellow text displaying the name of the band ‘The Nudge’ and information about the event. The intended audience for this visual text would be the typical customers of this venue. These would be those interested in alternative, electronic music.

In relation to other visual elements in this site, it shares similar aspects of the urban aesthetic of contemporary music artists. The selection of artworks within this site  a successful visual identity for the bar. Most of the other visual elements also add to the atmosphere that the site adheres towards. My opinion towards this artwork is that I find it interesting and eye catching. From viewing this work, I would have wanted to attend this event.

Sources:

http://www.eventfinda.co.nz/2014/nudge/nelson

http://www.thenudge.co.nz/

 

Assessment 1 Week 2 Task 3: Comparing and Constrasting

Both Site 1, the Michael Fowler Centre and Site 2, San Francisco Bar are popular venues in Wellington attracting people locally and nationally. They are quite different from each other but do share some similarities with what they bring to their audience.

The first difference between the two sites is their location and their surroundings. The Micheal Fowler Centre is located within a high-class and built up area. There are many business and venues similar to their site. In contrast with this point, the San Fran Bar is situated in an urban, street setting where there is an abundance of foot traffic. This area appears to be more cultured and welcoming to the public. The below images provide evidence to my point:

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San Fran Bar street view, Cuba Street, Gen Porter
michael-fowler-centre-wellington-town-hall
Michael Fowler Centre from Civic Square, Wellington, Positively Wellington Venues

The next difference between the Michael Fowler Centre and the San Francisco Bar is their target audience in relation to their atmosphere that each site brings. People that would normally attend an event at the Michael Fowler Centre would be a mature audience due to the events that they run and their pristine look. . This includes operas, musicals and exhibitions. San Fran on the other hand, has an alternative younger audience that would adhere to their urban, grunge character. The audience for the San Fran Bar are easy-going who are there to here the music and without being impacted too much by the type of look that the venue adheres to.

However, there two sites share a similarity of providing entertainment and pleasure to the public. No matter their atmosphere or surroundings they bring an audience to their events with the intent of bestowing a sense of enjoyment. In addition, both sites’ entertainment are art based, may they be music, dance, comedy, exhibitions or acting. One is able to absorb these aspects from either place that they visit.

Assessment 1 Week 2 Site 1 analysis: Micheal Fowler Centre

mich outside
Michael Fowler Centre, Wakefield Street, Wellington, Personal photograph Gen Porter

 

 

On our field trip, the first place that our group went to discover was the Michael Fowler Centre. It is a concert and convention centre that has held many well known operas and concerts since it opened in 1983. It is situated on Wakefield street that is near the bottom of Cuba street, being one of the main streets in Wellington. It is also a few hundred metres to the right of the Civic square that houses the Wellington City Gallery. Other buildings that surround it are mainly office type buildings that have a similar architectural style to the Michael Fowler Centre. The style that encases this venue is modern and pristine. The majority of the foyers on the ground floor are made of white marble and have an array of smooth arches along them. A typical audience that this centre would attract would be a mature audience ranging from the young adult to the elderly.

mich sign
Michael Fowler Centre Entrance, Wakefield Street, Wellington, Personal photo Gen Porter
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Michael Fowler Foyer, Wakefield Street, Personal photo Gen Porter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Michael Fowler Centre Staircase, Wakefield Street, Personal Photo Gen Porter

 

 

This centre is somewhat prominent on the internet on event websites that advertises places similar. These websites such as Positively Wellington Venues, Ticketek and Eventfinda tells us more about the centre and what shows will be on in the future. Here it advertises the New Zealand music festival where a selection of events will be performing at this venue. There is also a Wikipedia page displaying more about their history and past concerts that were on show.

michael fowler selfie
Michael Fowler Centre, Wakefield street. Photograph taken by Isla Anderson.

 

When we visited the centre, we were only allowed in the foyers on the bottom floor as the other two floors would only be accessible through purchasing a ticket when a particular event was on show or my staff. Due to their wide internet presence, I was able to access a variety of images of their auditorium on the higher floors. The picture below shows this space:

These images shows that it is a wide open space with a similar atmosphere to the images of the foyer. The auditorium to the right can seat up to 2,250 people (sourced from Eventfinda)

 

Sources:

http://marshallday.com/project/michael-fowler-centre-wellington-new-zealand

http://www.pwv.co.nz/our-venues/michael-fowler-centre/

http://www.eventfinda.co.nz/venue/michael-fowler-centre-wellington

Assessment 1 Week 2 Site 2 Analysis: San Francisco Bar

san outside
San Fran Bar street view, Cuba Street, Person photograph Gen Porter

The second site for my field trip that I visited was the San Francisco Bar a bar and nightclub commonly Known as ‘San Fran’. Located at on Cuba street in Wellington, it is a small but hidden wonder within this bustling street that holds many popular events in the city. It has a been an important part of New Zealand’s music and entertainment industry since the 1960’s (stated on their biography on the Eventfinda website) Referencing Michael Clarke’s ‘Language and Meaning’ text (page 24), identifying the context of the San Fran Bar, one is able to recognize the type of atmosphere that it brings within their space is in relation to when they opened in the 1960’s. When visiting this site, I was able to understand and appreciate that they have continued to maintain this time period.

It is a great place for locals and people all around to have a sociable drink with their friends or attend the late night concerts from both national and international bands that are held. A typical person that would visit this venue would range from young adults to adults within their 40’s or 50’s.

San Fran has an urban, grunge atmosphere that would appeal to the young adult or anyone who may be carefree or laid-back, looking to hear some good entertainment. When walking towards the bar it does not appear to be interesting. You enter into a dimly light corridor and then ascend a series of stairwells that are covered in graffiti or wall art. You reach entrance t the top where you see the stage and dance floor to the left of your view and the bar and seating to your right. To the right of the entrance, there is as the outside balcony overlooking Cuba Street.

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San Fran entrance, Cuba Street, Personal Photograph Gen Porter
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San Fran Bar stage and dance floor , Cuba Street, Personal Photograph Gen Porter

 

 

 

 

Through their space there is an abundance of urban posters of previous events either held there or that have a similar appearance to theirs is displayed on their walls. The posters add to their urban, grunge aesthetic as it is clear that the posters are more likely there as an expression of art more than an advertisement. The sound that accompanies the visual aspects of San Fran is loud music from live bands that perform. Their sound is often electronic or alternative mixes played by DJ’s.

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Graffiti in San Fran stairwell, Cuba Street, Personal Photograph Gen Porter

Their online presence is pretty apparent where you are able to find out about their events and acts that are on show. They have their own website where you are able to find this as well as contact information. They also appear on many event websites that advertise there events and more information about them as a venue.

I can easily say that would like to go back there because I enjoyed the atmosphere that San Fran held. I would want to watch another one of their bands play as I have in the past.

 

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Group selfie, San Fran Bar, Cuba Street. Photograph taken by Isla Anderson

 

Sources:

http://sanfran.co.nz/

http://www.eventfinda.co.nz/venue/san-francisco-bath-house

https://www.facebook.com/SanFranNZ/

Assessment 1 Week 1 Task 4:’Writing From the Gut’ Response

This is a response towards a chapter from a Sheilagh Walker thesis (Chapter seven: Conclusion. Notes to myself: Writing from the Gut. Auckland University 1996. pages 153-154. Print). The chapter shows her perspective towards the predominantly Pakeha and education system in New Zealand. Walker states the hardships of being Maori throughout her education. She also says “this is a struggle of all Maori children who enter the mono-cultural education system in Aotearoa”(153). She is representing all those in her position and saying that in this thesis, this is not her own story, it is only among many.

The lecturers tell her to be more original as thesis’s like these have indeed be written before. A point that she is trying to bring across is that even though this issue is unoriginal, Walker emphasizes that not much has been done to correct the situation. She states “I want to change the world, but more importantly live in the world, according to my Kaupapa..”(154).

Throughout Walker’s thesis, it is clear that she has a quite direct and forceful perspective. She is writing from her point of view thus using the pronouns my and I. She is dictating her personal approach of this issue whilst working on relating to the others also in her position. My response towards her tone and approach would be that I am understanding and remorseful of her situation. This is mainly because I believe that one should be able to be educated in relation to their culture. I enjoyed reading this section of her thesis even though I did not at times understand the language that she used. However, I think that adding Maori to the text helped relate to who she was and what the was intending to convey.